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Gold Dr. Who

DR. WHO?

Gold Dr. Who

IS THE DOCTOR IN?

It seems that the Lost Dutchman Legend has always attracted doctors to it. Perhaps this is because they helped the Indians or maybe it's part of the connection to the "Killer Mountains". As you'll see in next few pages, the cure becomes part of the curse. NOTICE THAT "CURES" IN AN anyGRAMMY SPELLS "CURSE" ... SEE MORE AT ANAGRAMS AND anaGRAMMYS.

Incidentally, do you know what miner surgery is? It's when the the doctor gives you the shaft for just A pache of stitches. As a side note, (perhaps an appendectomy?) it was Jim Bark (see roll over to the right) that first called the mine "The Lost Dutchman". He had a ranch at the base of the Superstitions and was always searching for Jacob Waltz' mine, but Jim kept barking up the wrong tree.

Dog

.A THORNE IN THE SADDLE

No discussion about the Lost Dutchman Mine is complete without telling the Dr. Thorne story. Supposedly at the end of the Civil War, an Army physician named Abraham Thorne was stationed near the west end of the Superstition Mountains at a place called Fort McDowell. This fort (Are you ready for a Knox Knox -- Who's there, joke?) was located where the Salt and Verde Rivers meet and around an area then called The Strip. (No relation to 77 Sunset, Las Vegas, or mining.) While there, he treated many Indian families and they were so "taken away with him" and his healing powers - that they did exactly that. The Apache Indians abducted Thorne and made him their medicine man. 

Some reports indicate that Thorne stayed with the Apache Tribe for as long as 7 years, (The stitches got a seven year itch.) until they granted his request to be released.  To display their gratitude for his help and healing powers, he was taken blindfolded to a place where he was allowed to gather up nuggets that were laying in abundance on the ground.  While gathering the nuggets, the Doctor saw a large hat-like mountain (Weaver's Needle again!) and the ruins of an old house. (Could this be the first usage of the term "goldbrick"?)  He was then returned to the Fort and some say that he later tried to re-find the gold spot, but was unsuccessful. 

Thorn in saddle


Joker

*It should be noted that military records show no trace of a Doctor Thorne at Fort McDowell in Arizona. Many believe that this is actually a Dr. Thorne from New Mexico and his "mine" and gold story somehow got mixed into the Lost Dutchman Legend. If this were the case, then the hat-like mountain might actually be the Sombrero Mountain, some 60 miles north of Weavers Needle and much more likely to be reached from New Mexico.

Another interesting fact is that around 1869, there was a search for the Thorne Mine by a party led by Corydon E. Cooley, later to be credited to the famous card game winning and naming of the town of Show Low.  As a trivia note, Phoenix was first settled in 1864 as a hay camp to supply food for the animals at Fort McDowell.


TAKE A WALKER,

HE'S A "SUPER STITCHER"

rabbit

rabbit

"What's Up Doc?"

 

One of the first published connections between Waltz and Peralta was an article written in the 1930's about Lizz & Ray Howlands, who came to Arizona to find the Lost Dutchman Mine. Supposedly, they had some letters from a great uncle -- none other than Jacob Wiser. These letters led them to believe that the sombrero peak of the Peralta story was Weaver's Needle. The Howlands did, in fact, take out about $40,000 in high-grade ore from the area. Incidentally, Weaver's Needle was named after Paulino Weaver, a French trapper and explorer. The Howlands also asserted that after Wiser had been wounded by the Apache, he made it to the ranch of an ex-Army surgeon named John Walker before he died.

Now, it seems Walker was a real Arizona pioneer. He was married to an Indian and led the Pima Tribe against the Apache in a famous battle of 1864. This is the fight where the Apache warriors leaped to their death from a 2,000 foot mountain rather than be captured. (What a cliff hanger! It's been said that the Apache would go to any "length" to avoid being taken prisoner, but 2,000 feet?) This battle is now called The Apache Leap.

Anyway, while being patched up by Walker, the injured Wiser supposedly drew a map of the gold mine on a piece of buckskin before he died. It is this map that many of the recent stories have come from and it's been found/sold innumerally over the course (curse) of the Legend. This is the second time that "weaved" discussed maps drawn by the partners, Jake Waltz and Jake Wiser. There are others, such as Peralta's and various Apache maps, but the "Double Jake" maps have been the most widely publicized.

RUTH ... HE WASN'T NO BABE

"I have only one superstition ... Touch all the bases when I hit a home run."   Babe Ruth

Babe Ruth and Babe the Ox

The Lost Dutchman Legend might have "died a normal death" as did most of the folklore of that time, except for the publicity generated in 1931, when a Dr. Adolph Ruth disappeared while searching for the legendary mine. 

Old-timers (old people who measure time or "Dr. Who Time Lords") say that the story started when Adolph's son, Dr. Erwin Ruth, had been working as a veterinarian near the Texas/Mexico border around 1912. While there, he befriended a Senor Gonzales, who gave him some old maps that had come from his relatives, the Peralta's.  Upon returning home, young Ruth gave the maps to his father, who had developed an interest in lost mines. The older Ruth became convinced that one of the maps matched the tale of the Dutchman and that the Peralta Mine was the Lost Dutchman Mine.  He thought that this was one of the missing links in the golden chain of clues. 

The Doctor's "ruth"less and mysterious death was a classic case in stupidity.  Here is an old man, going alone into very rugged, mountainous terrain in June -- totally unfamiliar with the desert.  To make matters worse, he was lame and had to walk with a cane.  A couple of cowhands (and DT always thought that cows had hoofs) from the famous Barkley Ranch took Ruth to the mountains.  He never returned!  Six months later, only his skull was found -- with two large holes in it. You can imagine that the newspapers had a field (gold) day with this.  Later, the rest of his skeleton was found, but his map was never recovered.  However, one of the items found was a diary with the quotation "Veni, Vidi, Vici" or "I came, I saw, I conquered".  This quote was used by the press of the day to tell the world that Ruth had really found the Lost Dutchman Mine and was subsequently murdered for it.  Since then, the quote has been used extensively in books and magazines.

After this event in the Thirties, the Legend has grown to include such terms as "Killer Mountains” and the "Curse of the Lost Dutchman Mine". And it was around this time that Waltz, the Peralta Mine, and the killings and strange happenings all came together to form the Legend of the Lost Dutchman.

While researching the Legend of the Lost Dutchman for the Goldbuster Guidebook that accompanied the Superstition Gold album, DoubleTake found many things about Gold.  NOTE: MANY OF THE WEB PAGES USED IN THE GOLD 'N STUFF SECTION HAVE BEEN TAKEN FROM THE GUIDEBOOK, BUT HAVE BEEN EDITED FOR THE INTERNET AND DO NOT NECESSARILY USE IN"CLUE" INFORMATION ABOUT THE DT'S SEARCH FOR THE GOLD.

USE THESE DOUBLETAKE LINKS (OR THE NAVIGATION BARS AT THE TOP) FOR MORE INFO ON THE LOST DUTCHMAN LEGEND.

THE LOST DUTCHMAN LEGEND - LORE OR MESS (MORE OR LESS)

HYSTERICALLY SPEAKING ... or ... IS GOLD JUST A 4-LETTER WORD?

"INDIAN GIVERS" ... or ... 10 INDIAN LEGENDS "GIVE OR" TAKE A LITTLE

THE EARLY SPANIARDS … "ORE" …. OLDEN GOLDIES

PERALTA & OTHER SPANISH SKATE BORDERS

THE DUTCHMAN WEAVES HIS WEB

DOCTOR WHO?

A FOOL'S GOLD & HIS MONEY ARE SOON PARTED ... or ... A "PYRITES" TREASURE "POT OF GOLD"

THE CURSE OF SUPERSTITION GOLD

GOLD FEVER RISES -- SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROLL MAKES IT THE FABU LOST GOLD MINE

 

S P O N S O R E D  L I N K S